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Photos from Camera Traps in Indonesia

  • Agile gibbon

    Agile gibbon (Hylobates agilis)

    Gibbons travel through the forest by swinging from tree to tree assisted by their extremely long arms and fingers.

  • Red muntjac

    Red muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak)

    A nocturnal muntjac takes a break from its nightly activities to check out the camera. WWF uses the camera traps to document the different fauna on the island of Sumatra.

  • Red muntjac

    Red muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak)

    Also known as the barking deer due to the sound it makes: “erk-erk-erk”.

  • Red muntjac

    Red muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak)

    This muntjac is ready for its close up.

  • Red muntjac

    Red muntjac (Muntiacus muntjak)

    Of the 80 camera traps set up in the forest by WWF, 18 were stolen and 25 were broken.

  • Argus

    Argus (Argusianus argus)

    Argus pheasant is a common inhabitant of Sumatra’s forests; however, it is threatened by habitat loss and degradation.

  • Argus

    Argus (Argusianus argus)

    This argus pheasant shows off its ornate plumage.

  • Crestless fireback

    Crestless fireback (Lophura erithrophthalma)

    Little is known about this rare bird and its numbers are declining because of illegal logging and forest conversion.

  • Crested serpent eagle

    Crested serpent eagle (Spilornis cheela)

    This bird hunts for reptiles, mostly snakes, on the ground.

  • Hawk eagle

    Hawk eagle (Spizaetus spp.)

    Already rare throughout its range, it may be nearing extinction in some areas because of heavy logging.

  • Hawk eagle

    Hawk eagle (Spizaetus spp.)

    Hawk eagle sunning its feathers in a forest clearing.

  • Clouded leopard

    Clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa)

    An excellent climber, the Malay name literally translates to “tree tiger”.

  • Clouded leopard

    Clouded leopard (Neofilis nebulosa)

    Clouded leopards are heavily hunted for their teeth, bones and unique coats.

  • Longtailed porcupine

    Longtailed porcupine (Trichys fasciculate)

    Its long tail can break off to save it from predators. Once broken off, the tail does not grow back.

  • Longtailed porcupine

    Longtailed porcupine (Trichys fasciculate)

    Longtailed porcupines spend most of the day in burrows, caves or hollow trees and emerge at night in search of seeds, fruits or bamboo shoots.

  • Malay badger

    Malay badger (Mydaus javanensis)

    Also known as the “stink badger” because of its strong stink glands.

  • Pigtailed macaque

    Pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina)

    Pig-tailed macaque are threatened by habitat loss and hunting by humans.

  • Pigtailed macaque

    Pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina)

    Pig-tailed macaques are easily identified by their short tails that sometimes curve like a pig’s tail.

  • Tiger

    Tiger (Panthera tigris)

    This tiger’s low, curved belly shows that it is pregnant.

  • Tiger

    Tiger (Panthera tigris)

    This tiger approaches the camera trap while stalking its prey.

  • Tiger

    Tiger (Panthera tigris)

    Tigers are identified by their unique stripe patterns.

On the Indonesian island of Sumatra, WWF collaborates with the Riau Forestry Department to use camera traps to help determine which species are present and absent in the region. While a "camera trap" might sound menacing, it actually does not harm wildlife. The name is derived from the manner in which it "captures" wildlife on film. Camera traps are not the intricate and elaborate devices you might imagine. These innovative conservation tools are in fact nothing more than everyday cameras, armed with infrared sensors that take a picture whenever they sense movement in the forest.

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