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  • Irrawaddy Dolphins: The Smiling Faces of the Mekong

    April 17, 2014

    Irrawaddy dolphins are an unusual species with small populations found in Southeast Asia. WWF works with local communities to develop fishery management zones to help sustain the fish population and conserve the species.

    dolphin jumping
  • Helping the World's Smallest Porpoise

    June 12, 2013

    On June 6, the Mexican government announced they would begin phasing out drift gillnets and substituting with more selective and vaquita-friendly fishing gear.

    Fins
  • Tracking turtles by satellite for better conservation

    April 02, 2013

    WWF places satellite tags on marine turtles in many areas around the world. The information collected from the tags helps us to design better management strategies for their conservation, such as creating marine protected areas for important feeding areas or addressing threats to nesting beaches.

    7-Release_satellite_tag_hawksbill_turtle_Gorgona_Island_Colombia_Molly_Edmonds.JPG
  • A Brighter Light on Bycatch

    April 02, 2013

    Gillnet fishing, one of the most common forms of fishing in the world, often leads to the accidental capture of non-targeted species. WWF is supporting work to illuminate nets so turtles can avoid swimming into them.

    Fishermen with net
  • Rare Dolphin Offered a Second Chance

    November 15, 2012

    There are fewer than 100 Irrawaddy dolphins in the Mekong River of Southeast Asia, and researchers fear the numbers are shrinking even further. But now the dolphins may have something to smile about. In September local government agencies in Cambodia agreed to work with WWF to conserve dolphins and minimize or eliminate deaths from gillnets.

    Irrawaddy dolphin breaching
  • Shark Facts vs. Shark Myths

    Get shark facts and help WWF dispel myths about sharks during Shark Week and beyond. How many of these have you heard?

    porbeagle shark

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