Toggle Nav
Call 888-WWF-TOUR
for more info or to sign up

South Africa Safaris

Get close-up looks at the 'Big Five' on a South Africa safari.

  • Sabi Sand Game Reserve is the prime location for "Big 5" viewing.

  • Burchell’s zebras usually travel in herds but disperse during the day to graze alone on coarse grasses.

  • Cheetahs drink in harmony at a watering hole in Kruger National Park

  • Vervet monkeys, which spend several hours a day grooming, are commonly spotted in Kruger National Park.

  • Stare into the eyes of some of the most magnificent species on the planet during safari drives.

From the massive-tusked African elephant to the sleek leopard, from squat rhinos to regal lions, they are all in South Africa in healthy numbers that provide one of Africa’s greatest safari experiences.

Available Tour

rhinos

Secluded South Africa Safari
The ultimate destination to get up-close looks at Africa's "Big Five." Explore Mashatu Game Reserve, Kruger National Park and Sabi Sand Game Reserve in search of rhinos, elephants, leopard, lions and buffalo.
10-day tours from $10,495


elephant

Custom South Africa Safari
Build your own personalized journey to South Africa on our tour operator’s custom safari planning website.
Dates and prices vary.

 

 

Available Extensions

Cape Town Extension 4 days, custom pricing

Articles

Reviews and Tips for South Africa
A Visit to Robben Island to Honor Nelson Mandela
East Africa vs. Southern Africa: How to Choose for your Safari
Where in the World Can You See Penguins?
Ten Wild Facts about the “Big Five”
The “Little Five”

WWF & Natural Habitat Adventures
Call (888) 993 – 8687 to book your spot on this tour. Questions? Email us at travel@wwfus.org.

WWF in South Africa
South Africa is home to the majority of Africa’s rhinos and, sadly, has been the epicenter of rhino poaching. Stopping such wildlife crimes is a priority initiative for WWF staff around the world. Read more here.

More Upcoming Tours

xShare Your Thoughts!

Just 10 minutes of your time can help improve our site! Answer a few quick questions and you can help us make worldwildlife.org better.

Start SurveyClose this box