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Fuller Science for Nature Fund

Overview

The Kathryn Fuller Science for Nature Fund supports and harnesses the most promising conservation science research and puts it into practice. Named in honor of the former president and CEO of WWF-US, the fund supports an annual Science for Nature Symposium featuring global leaders in science, policy, and conservation. Additionally, a regular seminar series provides a regular forum for the conservation community.

Kathryn Fuller

Kathryn S. Fuller, former president and chief executive of World Wildlife Fund

What WWF Is Doing

2013 Fuller Science for Nature Symposium

Every year WWF’s Fuller Symposium convenes thought leaders in science, policy, business, conservation and development to tackle the emerging issues facing our planet and advance science-based approaches to protect the future of nature. The 2013 Fuller Symposium explored how local and indigenous communities can empower themselves by managing their own natural resources—and in turn become a global force for conservation. This year’s one day event took place on November 13, 2013 at the National Geographic Society’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. 

Quarterly Seminar Series

WWF’s Science for Nature Seminars provide a regular forum for the conservation community to learn, discuss, network and inspire. The series seeks to advance the discussion of cutting edge research relating to international conservation by featuring distinguished scientists from across the globe. Seminars are:

  • Free
  • Open to the public
  • Held at WWF’s Washington, D.C. Headquarters (1250 24th St. NW, Washington, DC 20037)
  • Begin at 4:30 p.m., followed by a reception at 5:30 p.m.

For more information, contact Kate Graves at 202-495-4604.

 

Quarterly Seminar Series - April 2014

Eric Lambin

Do global market forces slow or grow habitat loss?

Who: Eric Lambin, School of Earth Sciences and Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University and Earth and Life Institute, University of Louvain, Belgium
When: April 3, 2014
Time: 4:30 PM
Where: WWF Conference Center; 1250 24th St N.W.; Washington, D.C. 20037

Eric Lambin divides his time between the University of Louvain (Belgium) and Stanford University, were he occupies the Ishiyama Provostial Professorship at the School of Earth Sciences and the Woods Institute for the Environment. His research tries to better understand patterns, causes, and impacts of land use changes in different parts of the world. He was Chair of the international scientific project Land Use and Land Cover Change (LUCC) from 1999 to 2005. He also contributed to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. He was awarded the 2009 Francqui prize and is Foreign Associate at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. His current research tries to understand how economic globalization affects global land use, and the trade-offs between agricultural production and nature conservation.

Join WWF and Eric Lambin as he discusses whether market forces are a friend or foe to biodiversity conservation.

Register Today h

Seminar Abstract: A central challenge for sustainability is how to preserve forest ecosystems and their rich biodiversity while enhancing food production. This challenge for developing countries confronts the force of economic globalization, which seeks cropland and triggers deforestation. Land use changes are increasingly associated with commodities produced for global markets. Globalization can be harnessed to increase land use efficiency rather than leading to uncontrolled land use expansion. The final consumers of agricultural and wood commodities, the corporations involved in their transformation and retailing, and civil society show a growing concern for sustainability. These actors are starting to express a preference for goods whose supply chain has been certified as meeting sustainability criteria. These private actors have designed policy interventions to influence land use through global markets. I will discuss the effectiveness of the main market-based interventions to promote sustainable land use. Overall, there is a lack of rigorous studies on the effectiveness of new, private land use policies, but available evidence suggests some potentially positive direct and indirect beneficial impacts.

Projects

  • 2013 Fuller Symposium: Forces for Nature

    The 2013 Fuller Symposium explored how local and indigenous communities can empower themselves by managing their own natural resources—and in turn become a global force for conservation. This year’s one day event took place on November 13, 2013 at the National Geographic Society’s headquarters in Washington, D.C.

  • 2012 Fuller Symposium: Conservation Crime

    Global leaders shared their insights on the growing crisis of wildlife crime at the 2012 Fuller Symposium. The symposium was held on November 14, 2012 at the National Geographic Society in Washington, D.C.

View All Projects

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