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Black Spider Monkey

Overview

  • Status
    Endangered
  • Scientific Name
    Ateles paniscus
  • Height
    16-24 inches
  • Weight
    15-19 pounds
  • Length
    16-24 inches (body), 24-32 inches (tail)
  • Habitats
    Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests

The black spider monkey—also known as the Guiana or red-faced spider monkey—is found in eastern South America in areas north of the Amazon River. They are one of seven species of spider monkeys found in Latin America and one of the largest primate species in South America.

Map data provided by IUCN.

Why They Matter

  • The black spider monkey is an essential part of the tropical rainforest ecosystem. They play a key role in seed dispersal, allowing their forest environment to continue to grow and thrive.

Threats

  • Extinction Risk Endangered
    1. EX
      Extinct

      No reasonable doubt that the last individual has died

    2. EW
      Extinct in the Wild

      Known only to survive in cultivation, in captivity or as a naturalised population

    3. CR
      Critically Endangered

      Facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the Wild

    4. EN
      Endangered

      Facing a high risk of extinction in the Wild

    5. VU
      Vulnerable

      Facing a high risk of extinction in the Wild

    6. NT
      Near Threatened

      Likely to qualify for a threatened category in the near future

    7. LC
      Least Concern

      Does not qualify for Critically Endangered, Endangered, Vulnerable, or Near Threatened

Black Spider Monkey

The destruction of tropical rainforests and threats from hunting pose the greatest challenge to the black spider monkey’s survival. Because they prefer mature tropical forests and seldom venture into disturbed habitats, these monkeys are especially vulnerable to the effects of forest fragmentation.

 

What WWF Is Doing

Black Spider Monkey

To combat the destruction of the black spider monkey’s habitat, WWF works to protect the forests they need to survive. We support the creation and management of protected areas and promote responsible forest management, including Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification, outside of protected areas.

Related Species

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